Digital afterlife – Biocentrism – Neuroscience – how far away is this?

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Can we copy someone’s mind one day so they can live on forever? Dr. Graziano says it’s possible. (joiseyshowaa/flickr cc)

Two CBC Radio Pod Casts

Digital afterlife: Can our minds live on after death?

CBC Radio – The Current with Anna Maria Tremonti – – Oct 5 2016
As scientists continue to learn more about the brain, some predict that — eventually— a brain can be copied in a computer well enough to allow a person to “live on” after the body dies.  More details below
More info and Pod Cast

More disruptors

http://www.cbc.ca/radio/thecurrent/features/disruptors

Related

Biocentrism: Rethinking Time, Space, Consciousness, and the Illusion of Death

CBC Radio – Ideas with Paul Kennedy – Tuesday October 04, 2016
More info and Pod Cast

Archives of test and images from above.  For podcasts use above links

Digital afterlife: Can our minds live on after death?

CBC Radio – The Current with Anna Maria Tremonti – – Oct 5 2016

As scientists continue to learn more about the brain, some predict that — eventually— a brain can be copied in a computer well enough to allow a person to “live on” after the body dies.

Dr. Michael Graziano, a professor of neuroscience at Princeton University, believes it will be possible to live on in a computer after death. He tells The Current‘s Anna Maria Tremonti how a digital afterlife in the future can include a consciousness.

“We could create a second you, or at least a second brain that thinks it’s you, has your memories, your personality,” says Graziano on the possibility of a digital afterlife.

The concept of a digital afterlife opens up many interesting possibilities for people concerned with continuity.

— above image —

Can we copy someone’s mind one day so they can live on forever? Dr. Graziano says it’s possible.

“Let’s say you’re an analyst for a company and you die. Your digital self is still there. It could Skype in on business meetings,” says Graziano.

“I mean there’s a lot of weird things that could go on …. in this digital form of you.”

But, that technology wouldn’t come without a catch. Graziano says there are also dangers to creating a digital afterlife since, “biological life would become devalued.”

Futurist Sanjay Khanna agrees there are dangers and says this kind of digital afterlife could potentially change the way we die.

“It poses certain threats to religions, to the notions of afterlife they imagine,” Khanna tells Tremonti.

“Some who would be able to imagine these things living in parallel, and others who would see them in absolute conflict with their spiritual and religious beliefs.”

Khanna imagines a digital afterlife would change the way we deal with death emotionally, as well. He says it may become another way to distract ourselves from truly grieving.

“It would be a way to mitigate loss in spite of a great feeling of loss.”

But Khanna says he can’t imagine this technology could “eliminate the natural stages of grief that human beings go through when a physical body leaves a practical and vibrant presence in our lives.”

Listen to the full conversation at the top of this web post.

This segment was produced by The Current’s Sarah Grant.


 

Biocentrism: Rethinking Time, Space, Consciousness, and the Illusion of Death

CBC Radio – Ideas with Paul Kennedy – Tuesday October 04, 2016

Paul Kennedy has his understanding of reality turned-upside-down by Dr. Robert Lanza in this paradigm-shifting hour. Dr. Lanza provides a compelling argument for consciousness as the basis for the universe, rather than consciousness simply being its by-product.

Why do you insist the universe is not a conscious intelligence, when it gives birth to conscious intelligences?”, questioned the Roman philosopher Cicero. Over two-thousand years later scientist Dr. Robert Lanza responds to Cicero’s philosophical query with a groundbreaking book Beyond Biocentrism: Rethinking Time, Space, Consciousness, and the Illusion of Death. Biocentrism is a new theory that upends everything we might assume about ourselves and the world around us. The most basic assumption Dr. Lanza’s biocentric theory challenges is our fundamental understanding of the “way things are.”

“Biologists describe the origin of life as a random occurrence in a dead universe, but have no real understanding of how life began or why the universe appears to have been exquisitely designed for its emergence.” 

 

Science tells us that our universe all began with a sudden explosion  — a big bang — about 13.8 billion years ago. Dr. Lanza writes:“In this model, the universe was presented as a kind of self-operating machine. It was composed of stupid stuff, meaning atoms of hydrogen and other elements that had no innate intelligence. Nor did any sort of external intelligence rule. Rather, unseen forces such as gravity and electromagnetism, acting according to the random laws of chance, produced everything we observe… As for how consciousness could arise in the first place, no one even has guesses. We cannot fathom how lumps of carbon, drops of water, or atoms of insensate hydrogen ever came together and acquired a sense of smell. The issue is apparently too baffling to raise at all.” 

In this model the universe is regarded as objective — existing independent of any observer — made of matter, ruled by mechanistic laws. Consciousness — or the observer — is simply a part of the matter-based universe. But this model not only fails to fully address the conundrum of consciousness. It also fails to answer other puzzling questions: what was there before the Big Bang? Why does the universe seem exquisitely designed for the emergence of life? Why is there something instead of nothing?  This is where Dr. Lanza’s biocentric theory of the universe comes in, to show us the inherent flaw in the standard explanation for origins of the universe.

 

“Most people believe that there’s an independent physical universe “out there” that has nothing to do with our awareness of it.  This seeming truth persisted without much dissent until the birth of quantum mechanics. Only then did a credible science voice appear, which resonated with those who claimed that the universe does not seem to exist without a perceiver of that universe.”

 

Biocentrism - Dr. Robert Lanza

Dr. Robert Lanza

Dr. Lanza says the problem is we have everything upside down. He takes the common assumption that the universe led to the creation of life and argues that it’s the other way around: that life is not a byproduct of the universe, but its very source. Or put another way, consciousness is what gives rise to our sense of there being an “out there” when, in fact, the world we experience around us is actually created in our consciousness. As if anticipating our bemused response, Dr. Lanza writes: “But, you may protest, aren’t there two worlds? The external ‘real world’, and then another, separate visual world in your head?  No, there is only one. Where the visual image is perceived is where it actually is. There is nothing outside of of perception … but the illusion of an external world comes from language. Everyone you meet participates in the same charade. It’s not malevolent, but useful, as when you say, ‘Please pass the salt over there.’  What purpose would it serve to ask for that salt shaker ‘inside your head’?  It is customary to allude to the world as existing outside of us.”
Dr. Robert Lanza is a noted scientist, who has been called by U.S. News & World a “genius” and “renegade thinker”, likening him to Albert Einstein. He is head of Astellas Global Regenerative Medicine, Octata Chief Scientific Officer, and adjunct professor at Wake Forest University School of Medicine in North Carolina.
Related websites:

About Kevin Yaworski

I use my blog to write about things I find interesting or that I think are matter of public interest.
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